Wednesday, May 28, 2014

An "Arc-de-Triomphe" - India Gate

HOW TO REACH HERE:
By metro: Get down at Barakhamba Road Metro Station or Patel Chowk
By road: It is in connought Place Near Rajpath


India Gate at night.


HISTORY: The India Gate was structured and designed by Edwin Lutyens in 1921.The foundation stone was laid by His Royal Highness - The Duke of Connaught. The India Gate was built to commemorate the British and Indian soldiers who died in the First World War and hundreds of soldiers who lost their lives in the Northwest Frontier, the Afghan war of 1919 and the Indo-Pak war in 1971. Today it salutes the soldiers who sacrificed their lives during World War I.
The India gate, which is illuminated every evening, from 19:00 to 21:30, is a major tourist attraction. Motor cars, moved through India Gate, till it was closed to traffic. The Republic Day Parade starts from Rashtrapati Bhavan and passes around the India Gate.


Inscription
The 42-metre tall India Gate, stands on a low base of red Bharatpur stone and rises in stages to a huge moulding. The shallow domed bowl at the top was intended to be filled with burning oil on anniversaries but this is rarely done. The India Gate hexagon complex, with a diameter of about 625 metres, covers approximately 306,000m² in area.
The cornice is inscribed with the Imperial suns while both sides of the arch have INDIA, flanked by the dates 1914 at left and 1919 at right. Below the word INDIA, is inscribed, in capital letters:
TO THE DEAD OF THE INDIAN ARMIES WHO FELL HONOURED IN FRANCE AND FLANDERS MESOPOTAMIA AND PERSIA EAST AFRICA GALLIPOLI AND ELSEWHERE IN THE NEAR AND THE FAR-EAST AND IN SACRED MEMORY ALSO OF THOSE WHOSE NAMES ARE RECORDED AND WHO FELL IN INDIA OR THE NORTH-WEST FRONTIER AND DURING THE THIRD AFGHAN WAR.





Amar Jawan Jyoti, or the flame of the immortal soldier, is a structure consisting of black marble plinth, with reversed rifle, capped by war helmet, bound by four urns, each with the permanent light (jyoti) from (CNG) flames, erected under the India Gate in the wake Liberation of Bangladesh in December 1971 to commemorate Indian soldiers killed in the defense of their country. It was inaugurated by Prime Minister Indira Gandhi on 26 January 1972, the 23rd Republic Day. Since the installation of the Amar Jawan Jyoti, in 1972, it has served as India’s Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Amar Jawan Jyoti is manned round the clock by soldiers drawn from the three services of the Indian armed forces. Wreaths are placed at the Amar Jawan Jyoti on Vijay Diwas, and on 26 January, by the Prime Minister of India, Chiefs of Armed Forces, and other dignitaries





About 150 metres East of the India Gate war memorial, at a junction of six roads, is a 73-foot cupola, inspired by a sixth-century pavilion from Mahabalipuram, under which was a fifty-foot tall statue of King George V, by C.S. Jagger, until it was removed to Coronation Park, in which are located a number of other British Raj-era statues. In recent years rumours of placing a statue of Mahatma Gandhi or another national hero have circulated, but as of September 2013 no plans have been made to do such a thing.

India Gate- A salute to our soldiers.